Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

“We have lived in their skins, used their antlers for tools and bows, eaten their meat and trekked in their steps. Native Americans have their buffalo, but Europeans can also look to the red stag with the same feeling, the same deep roots in the dark earth of pre-history.  We grew up together. Men and stags and antlers go back to the cave, and beyond.   Deer and men are old partners – we try to catch them, they elude us. They know us from a thousand generations, and in our hearts we still long for them.”   (from Wild South)   This image is from talented New...

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Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

The eastern side of New Zealand’s Southern Alps is generally semi arid and open but the more accessible valleys have high hunting pressure as a result. It’s here that the legendary tahr hunting grounds are found—the Godley, Rakaia, Havelock, Dobson and Rangitata. Like red stags, tahr bulls go through a bachelor period over summer followed by a move to nanny rangelands during the winter rut.  This image is courtesy of my friend Gerald Telford, a first class hunting and fishing outfitter operating in the heart of the South Island...

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Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

There are phases in understanding Cape buffalo. At first the fearsome reputation makes them intimidating to anyone on foot and up close. Then the penny drops that undisturbed buff are not that different from flighty cows. Eventually – and this is the bit that takes some luck to get through – the third stage kicks in. Yes, left to themselves buff are mostly like cows…except for the odd psychopath with issues. Trouble is he’ll look just like all the rest, and when things go downhill they go down fast. Bottom line is when you get the nose in the air and a hard stare...

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Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

The dog is dry and sleeping, the fire is crackling. Time to clean up, sip a wee dram and remember.

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Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

The gringo’s perdiz. Argentina’s partridge are the last great secret for wannabe gentlemen. A pleasant stroll in a vast flat field with a nice double and a good pointing dog or two – what could be better? Perdiz are not partidge at all but a form of tinamou, related to rheas and the other large flightless birds. You can see it in their head structure and movement, though the size is obviously much different. Like the rhea, tinamou males establish a breeding territory, partner with several girlfriends and then hatch their eggs in a communal nest, something true game birds...

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Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

Most elephant are easy to get up on in thick cover, if you have the wind. If it swings the advantages suddenly lie with him – he can cut through thick jesse or thorn like butter, you can’t. This is an aggressive investigation, not a real charge.

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Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

Tahr are highly unusual. The most obvious thing when seeing them camped on a ridge for the first time is how much bigger the bulls are than the nannies. The second and more startling impression only comes when they become agitated and begin to move across sheer rock and icy horrors with astonishing speed. Tahr will cheerfully launch themselves across apparently vertical cliffs or leap down sheer drops without hesitation.  

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Posted by on Sep 10, 2012 in Featured | 0 comments

Ingwe is not stupid. Leopards know us of old and while happy to stay out of the way, living up in the rocks and picking off antelope or village dogs, he is not afraid of us in a pinch. Wounded or just hassled they will charge quickly and silently. The Matabele regarded killing a leopard as a test of manhood. It was done using a club and a thorny branch as a primitive shield. Whatever people may say from the comforts of their living rooms today this was surely a test of courage. Put it this way, if I saw it on a job application it would go in the ‘to be interviewed’ pile. Clealy a...

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